Choosing the Best Alpaca Diet

Choosing the best alpaca diet is based on the lifestage (e.g., growing, reproducing or maintenance) and lifestyle (e.g., showing or pleasure animal) of your alpaca. Each Mazuri® diet was designed in conjunction with a leading alpaca veterinarian and nutritionist, Dr. Norm Evans. All have been tested for palatability. Always provide plenty of clean, fresh water, and test your hay and/or pasture regularly to ensure that animals are receiving appropriate nutrition.

For more information on any of these diets, consult the detailed spec sheets at www.mazuri.com or contact a Customer Service representative.
 
 
Lifestage & Lifestyle Recommended Diet Description Daily Feeding Directions
 
Growing Cria
 
Alpaca Growth & Repro - 56CD Alpaca UltimatE® – 561W**
 
Coarse Sweet Feed Pelleted Feed
 
0.33 - 0.50 lb per 50 lb body wt
0.33 - 0.50 lb per 50 lb body wt
 

Maintenance

(not breeding/showing)
Alpaca Chews - 56BU Alpaca Crumbles- 5MKA
Alpaca & Llama Maintenance - 561J
Mini-cube Crumbles Pelleted Feed 0.25-0.50 lb per 100 lb body wt 0.25-0.50 lb per 100 lb body wt
0.50 lb per 100 lb body wt
 
 
Breeding Females
 
Alpaca Growth & Repro - 56CD Alpaca UltimatE® – 561W** Coarse Sweet Feed Pelleted Feed 0.75 - 1 lb per per animal
0.75 - 1 lb per per animal
 
Lactating Females
 
Alpaca Growth & Repro - 56CD Alpaca UltimatE® – 561W**
 
Coarse Sweet Feed Pelleted Feed
 
1.0-1.25 lb per animal 1.0-1.25 lb per animal
 

Show Animals

Alpaca UltimatE® – 561W**
Fiber Enhancer® - 56DJ
Alpaca Vitamin/ Mineral Blend 'E'®- 56CB
 
Pelleted Feed
Omega-3/antioxidant supplement Vitamin/mineral blend
 
Feed for appropriate lifestage  Top dress feed at 2 oz per day per adult
Free choice or top dress hay or pasture based diets (~0.5 oz per day)
 
* DO NOT FEED TO SHEEP due to levels of copper. Diets are designed to complement forages containing 4 to 15 ppm Cu.
 
** Contains Fiber Enhancer® nutrition - no need to provide additional supplements
 
 
Note: All Mazuri® Alpaca Diets are designed to be fed with hay or pasture. Hay is not a complete feed and may be lacking in several nutrients including vitamin E (which is destroyed during the normal haying process) and others, such as selenium, may be deficient based on soil conditions.  Typical pasture may also be deficient because of soil conditions.  It is recommended you analyze both your hay and pasture to ensure you are feeding the appropriate amount of pellets, hay and/or pasture grasses to your animal to meet their nutritional requirements.  Additionally, always provide your animals with clean, fresh water.